Tuesday, November 13, 2007

Seeing with new eyes

The last several months have been revelatory or humbling, depending upon my pregnancy hormones. Avery is moving ahead at such a speed that it's hard to digest it all, some days I am more aware of the language development, other days her athletic prowess, every moment her 0-60 in 3 seconds charisma. Looking back I realize that so much of what she is accomplishing we never gave Briar an opportunity to try - feeding herself soup at 16 months? Ha, I barely let her hold a sandwich.

Today watching Briar play Caribou for the first time I was shocked. She was standing at her Papa's knee, a look of reverent anticipation colored with a Christmas morning like excitement. He taught her how to play and, to what was shameful surprise on my part, she totally got it. She's three, has been since September.

A series of flipped images beginning with the letters A, B, or C and in yellow, red or blue, spelled a simple message:

Don't be afraid to let her try.
To let her succeed.
To let her fail.


And now, I won't, but I can't promise I won't have a lump in my throat.


Stumble Upon Toolbar

13 comments:

BetteJo said...

I'm not sure why that video made me leak a tear! It was so sweet, I wanted it to last longer. I suppose it's that Mom feeling of watching your child do something they've learned, the progression - what a miracle it all is. And it's never so evident as during those early ages. What a doll. :)

flutter said...

Oh, me too with the lump in my throat

Colleen said...

Why is it so surprising to suddenly realize the things they can do? Zoe shocks me every day. They develop so quickly. They're so amazing.

Kimberly said...

I am constantly amazed by what my children can accomplish when allowed. They grow up way too fast.

Crystal said...

Ohh, that looks like fun. It looks like an Amelia Christmas gift!! Sometime in the rush of everyday life I forget to let them try things before I do it for them. It is faster, cleaner, and better if I do it for them. But it is smarter to let them try. I want to be a smarter mom. Boy this mom stuff is so complicated. Just when I think I have it down, BAM, there is something else I have to make a conscious effort to remember to do. But we are trying and that is what is important.

Heather said...

It is so hard to remember that I need to give my kids the chance to succeed or fail themselves. It's usually so much faster to just do it myself.

Thanks for the reminder.

Although for me it's sometimes the opposite with my daughter. I expect so much from her I sometimes forget that she still is only 5.

Angela said...

Okay...for some reason my last 2 attempts to leave a comment were unsuccessful.

So sweet, what a little cutie. Isn't it amazing how quickly time goes by and the learning curve for children always astounds me.
(I know, such witty and insightful comments, aren't you glad blogger didn't eat them) ;-)

Two Shews said...

I found this same thing to be true with my two-- only 20 months apart. Jake was hovered over, worried over, assisted in every task. With two, there just wasn't the time, and Annie has reaped definite benefits.

I read somewhere that first children live in an adult's world, and that second children live in a child's world. And I think that living with a constant peer to emulate and only 50% of mommy's attention/neuroses has been great for Annie.

cce said...

My kids absolutely loveeddddd that game when they were her age.

Janet said...

Indeed.

I watched Elyse cover her eyes and count "two, free, eight, seven, ten!" this morning while her siblings ran to hide.

What the??!! That totally snuck up on me.

The Hotfessional said...

Hell girlfriend. Shortman is 16 and driving and I still (yes, still dammit) believe he's too young to cook on the stove.

sigh. It never ends.

By the way, there's something for you over at my place. Kisses to you and those girls.

carrie said...

And your third will probably be making coffee at 16 months *wink*!

I loved this, and also, can relate.

Kelly said...

So much fun to be let into that experience. Thank you.